The Moho the Merrier

I’m a little late with this, as it happened December of last year, but –

After many years with Smith Micro, Moho animation software is finally back with its creator Mike Clifton and his company Lost Marble – with help from former Moho Product Manager, Victor Paredes, who is now Supervisor of Moho Animation at Cartoon Saloon.

The software was originally developed under the name “Moho” in 1999 by Mike Clifton at LostMarble. (LostMarble is also the developer of Papagayo, a free lip sync software which works with Moho.) The software was distributed by E Frontier until 2007, when it was taken over by Smith Micro and renamed Anime Studio, as a marketing companion for the former Manga Studio.

http://www.lostmarble.com/

I’ve been using Moho since it was Anime Studio, and I’m glad to see it back in the hands of it’s creator. It’s already an excellent software, but I think this change will breathe new life into it.

Case in point:

On 26th April 2021, Lost Marble LLC released Moho 13.5, with new features including Vitruvian Bones, Wind Dynamics and Quad meshes, as well as a slightly refreshed User Interface.

And the great work by Cartoon Saloon, is proving Moho is professional level good.

Cartoon Saloon was established in Kilkenny during 1999 by Tomm Moore, Nora Twomey, and Paul Young.

The studio is best known for its animated feature films The Secret of Kells, Song of the Sea, The Breadwinner and Wolfwalkers. Their works have received five Academy Award nominations, their first four feature length works all received nominations for Best Animated Feature and one for Best Animated Short Film (Late Afternoon). The company also developed the cartoon series Skunk Fu!, Puffin Rock, Dorg Van Dango and Vikingskool.

As of 2020, the studio employs 300 animators.

As of 2021, Cartoon Saloon is in production of its TV series, Vikingskool and Nora Twomey’s second feature for Netflix, My Father’s Dragon.

Project Snowcap (working title) will be animated with Moho animation software.

Fox in a Moho timeline

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Part 8 Aristotle’s Poetics (Greek: Περὶ ποιητικῆς Peri poietikês; Latin: De Poetica; c. 335 BC) is the earliest surviving work of dramatic theory and first extant philosophical treatise to focus on literary theory. In this text Aristotle offers an account of ποιητική, which refers to poetry or more literally “the poetic art,” deriving from theContinue reading “Aristotle’s Poetics 8”

Aristotle’s Poetics 7

Part 7 Aristotle’s Poetics (Greek: Περὶ ποιητικῆς Peri poietikês; Latin: De Poetica; c. 335 BC) is the earliest surviving work of dramatic theory and first extant philosophical treatise to focus on literary theory. In this text Aristotle offers an account of ποιητική, which refers to poetry or more literally “the poetic art,” deriving from theContinue reading “Aristotle’s Poetics 7”

Aristotle’s Poetics 6

Part 6 Aristotle’s Poetics (Greek: Περὶ ποιητικῆς Peri poietikês; Latin: De Poetica; c. 335 BC) is the earliest surviving work of dramatic theory and first extant philosophical treatise to focus on literary theory. In this text Aristotle offers an account of ποιητική, which refers to poetry or more literally “the poetic art,” deriving from theContinue reading “Aristotle’s Poetics 6”

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